Dermatologist in Denver, CO
Cherry Creek Dermatology
3773 Cherry Creek North Dr
Denver, CO 80209
(303) 388-5629
(303) 321-7586 fax
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Posts for: July, 2015

By Dr. Maloney
July 28, 2015
Category: Skin Health
Tags: tan   skin   lotion  

 

 
These basic tips will help you apply a self-tanner so you get even coverage and longer-lasting results.  
 

Steps

  1. Exfoliate. Use a washcloth to exfoliate the skin prior to applying a self-tanner. Using an exfoliating product also will help remove dead skin cells. Spend a little more time exfoliating where your skin is thickest — elbows, knees and ankles.
  2. Dry your skin. Drying your skin before you apply a self-tanner helps it go on evenly. 
  3. Apply in sections. Apply the self-tanner in sections (such as the arms, then legs, followed by the torso). Massage the self-tanner into your skin in a circular motion.
  4. Wash your hands after each section. You will avoid orange-colored palms by washing your hands with soap and water after you finish applying the self-tanner to each section of your body.
  5. Blend at your wrists and ankles. For a natural look, you need to lightly extend the tanner from your wrists to your hands and from your ankles to your feet. 
  6. Dilute over your joints. Dilute the self-tanner on the knees, ankles and elbows, because these areas tend to absorb more self-tanner than the rest of the skin. To dilute, lightly rub with a damp towel or apply a thin layer of lotion on top of the self-tanner.
  7. Give your skin time to dry. Wait at least 10 minutes before getting dressed. For the next three hours, it is best to wear loose clothing and try to avoid sweating.
  8. Apply sunscreen every day. You still need to protect your skin with sunscreen. Be sure that your sunscreen offers all of the following:
    • SPF 30 or higher.
    • Broad-spectrum protection (UVA/UVB protection).
    • Water resistance.

By Dr. Maloney
July 28, 2015
Category: Scientific Studies
Tags: Acne   research  

Volunteers for Facial Acne Clinical Study:

We are currently enrolling qualified participants in a clinical research
study with a new investigational drug.

To qualify, you must be between the ages of 9 and 45, have acne pimples on your face and be in good general health.

Health insurance is not needed to participate and you may receive compensation for time and travel.

Participants must be willing to make six site visits.

Call 303 388 5629 to speak with our research department or email [email protected]


By Dr. Maloney
July 27, 2015
Category: Skin News
Tags: bed bugs  

 

Bedbugs: Diagnosis, treatment, and outcome

 
 
                Bed_bug_bites_3jpg.jpg
 
Bedbug bites: When bedbugs bite, you often see clusters of bites. Each cluster usually contains 3 to 5 bites that appear in a zigzag pattern.

How do you know if you have bedbugs?

To find out if you have bedbugs, you need to look for two things:

  1. Bites on your body.
  2. Signs of bedbugs.

Bites on your body: If you have bedbugs, you’re likely to have bites. Bedbug bites usually cause itchy welts. These welts usually appear in a zigzag pattern as show in the photo above.

You’ll seldom see bedbugs, so many people mistakenly believe that mosquitos, fleas, or spiders bit them. Sometimes people mistake bedbug bites for a common skin condition such as an itchy rash, hives, or chickenpox.

To make sure you have bedbugs, you’ll need to look for signs of bedbugs.

How to check for bedbugs



 

Although bedbugs don’t usually require serious medical attention, they can cause a great deal of anxiety and restless nights. To help find bedbugs before they find you (and your belongings), dermatologists recommend looking for the following signs near places where you sleep.

Signs of bedbugs: This step is important. If you have a bedbug infestation, you need to find out so that you can get rid of the bedbugs. Getting rid of the bedbugs is the only way to stop the bites.

If you have a large number of bedbugs, you may see the bugs. Most people, however, only see signs of bedbugs. To look for signs of bedbugs, check the places that people sleep for the following:

  • A sweet, musty odor: Take a deep breath. If you notice a sweet, musty in your hotel room, cruise ship cabin, or other sleeping area, there may be a heavy bedbug infestation in the room. Bedbugs produce chemicals to help them communicate, although not everyone will notice the smell.
  • Specks of blood on bedding, mattresses, or upholstered furniture such as couches and headboards: Look carefully at your blankets, sheets, and mattress pads and then check the mattress and box spring. Are there specks of blood anywhere, especially near the seams? If so, there could be a bedbug infestation. You should also check for specks of blood on all upholstered furniture, including couches and headboards.
  • Exoskeletons: Bedbugs have an outer shell that they shed and leave behind. Do you see shell-like remains on the mattress, mattress pad, or beneath couch cushions?
  • Tiny, blackish specks: If you see blackish specks on the bedding, mattress, headboard, or beneath couch cushions, it could be bedbug excrement. 
  • Eggs: After mating, female bedbugs lay white, oval egs in cracks and crevices. Keep in mind that these will be small, as a bedbug is only about the size of an apple seed. The photo below shows a bedbug near eggs. The photo was magnified so that you can see the bedbug and eggs.

If you do get bedbugs and have many bites or a bite that looks infected, see a board-certified dermatologist. A dermatologist can treat an infection and help relieve the itch.

 

                bedbug with eggs

Bedbug with eggs: A bedbug is a tiny insect with broad, oval body. If it has recently eaten, it has a reddish-brown color.

If you see bedbugs, they will likely scurry toward the closest hiding place. Any dark place such as inside a mattress or even a picture frame makes a good hiding place.

As you watch bedbugs move, it can look like they are flying or jumping because they can crawl quickly. Bedbugs cannot fly or jump; they can only crawl.

If you find signs of bedbugs, call a pest-control company or your property manager. You should not use bug spray or a fogger. These products have little effect on bedbugs.

Treating bedbug bites

You should see a dermatologist for treatment if you have:

  • Many bites.
  • Blisters.
  • Skin infection (bites feel tender or ooze discharge such as pus).
  • An allergic skin reaction (skin red and swollen or hives).

Your dermatologist may prescribe the following to treat bedbug bites:

Allergic reaction: Some people may require an injection of an antihistamine, corticosteroid, or epinephrine (adrenaline) for a severe allergic reaction.

Infection: An infection may require an antibiotic. If the infection is mild, your dermatologist may recommend an antiseptic medication that you can buy without a prescription. Your dermatologist will tell you which one to use. Your dermatologist also may recommend an antiseptic to prevent a skin infection.

Itch: A prescription antihistamine pill or liquid can help. You also can apply a corticosteroid to the bites. Your dermatologist will tell you which is best for you.

Bedbugs bites can be intensely itchy, so treat the itch to prevent scratching. Scratching can cause a skin infection.

At-home treatment

If you do not have any signs of an infection or a serious reaction, you can often treat the bites at home.

To treat bedbug bites:

  • Wash the bites with soap and water. This will help prevent a skin infection and help reduce itchiness.
  • If the bites itch, apply a corticosteroid cream to the bites. You can get a weak form of this medicine without a prescription at your local drugstore. Stronger corticosteroids require a prescription.

Bedbug bites usually heal and go away within a week or two.

Learn more about bedbugs:

 

Leverkus M et al. “Bullous Allergic Hypersensitivity to Bedbug Bites Mediated by IgE against Salivary Nitrophorin.” J of Invest Dermatol. 2006;126:2364-2366. 

Liebold K et al. “Disseminated bullous eruption with systemic reaction caused by Cimex lectularius.”  J Euro Acad of Dermat and Vener. 2003;17:461-463.

Steen CJ, Carbonaro PA, Schwartz RA. “Arthropods in dermatology.”  J Am Acad Dermatol 2004; 50:819-42.


Cherry Creek Dermatology is currently enrolling patients for a clinical trial using a new acne medication.  Volunteers receive no-cost medication and reimbursement for travel, for more information please call our research department at 303 388 5629 today.




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